Katie Workman, a chef and writer, says cooking fatigue during the pandemic is “no joke.”

Todd Coleman


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Todd Coleman

Katie Workman, a chef and writer, says cooking fatigue during the pandemic is “no joke.”

Todd Coleman

Months into the coronavirus pandemic, the initial novelty of whipping up more homemade meals is fading.

Earlier this year, people busied themselves with batches of sourdough and banana bread. Americans bought groceries like never before, and embraced the chance to dabble in elaborate cooking projects.

Now, it looks like many are losing steam. Katie Workman, a chef and writer

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In the early days of stay-at-home orders, so many of us collectively discovered the joys of cooking: making sourdough, baking elaborate desserts, making pasta from scratch. But after months of being home, the novelty has worn off and cooking has become a repetitive chore.

A recent survey of 2,000 Americans, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Sun Basket, found that 55% of Americans are experiencing “cooking fatigue.” Respondents said they cook an average of nine times a week, yet they’ve eaten the same meal 28 times since the pandemic started. Unsurprisingly, most people say they’re

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