The top reality television news of the month is certainly the return of Top Chef. While the new season of the cooking competition series has set food fans abuzz, it is hard to shake the feeling that it is yet another culinary series that has been wholly co-opted by the competitive nature of television. Many executives seem to think that competition series are the only way forward on Food Network and other similar entities.

RELATED: Chopped And 9 Best Cooking Competition Shows, Ranked By IMDb

Fortunately, the history of food on the small screen is one that also welcomes

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While Food Network still has many great shows, there are others that fans miss dearly. Hopefully, many of these old favorites will be on Discovery+.

Food Network has been in business for nearly three decades, and the channel has steadily grown into the premiere destination for food celebrities. From intense professional chef challenges to relaxing home cooking shows, there’s always something entertaining happening on Food Network.

RELATED: 10 Foodie Shows To Stream If You Love Food Network

While the network still has many great shows, there are others that fans miss dearly. Even kids of the 1990s and 2000s

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You don’t need me to point out how much COVID-19 took away from all of us in 2020, but in a bizarre twist, the challenges of quarantine might have inadvertently pushed one genre to the next tier of excellence. Cooking shows — whether hosted on Food Network, HBO Max, or YouTube channels — nimbly adjusted to home kitchens where chefs finally had to confront the reality home cooks faced every day. More than that, the format of cooking shows like Selena + Chef or Amy Schumer Learns to Cook helped professional chefs react on the fly to a novice’s

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Marcus Samuelsson cooks onstage with audience participant during the Grand Tasting presented by ShopRite featuring Culinary Demonstrations at The IKEA Kitchen presented by Capital One at Pier 94 on October 13, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images for NYCWFF)

Conversations about food among the Black community inevitably leads to debates. Who’s bringing the potato salad? Who made the mac and cheese? Is the gumbo to be trusted? Sugar or salt on grits? And, of course, the legendary jollof wars between Ghanaians and Nigerians.

The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food, a new

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